Community PLC - The role of community groups in supporting local government heritage entrepreneurship

Carrington, Carl (2018) Community PLC - The role of community groups in supporting local government heritage entrepreneurship. In: ICOMOS 19th General Assembly and Scientific Symposium "Heritage and Democracy", 13-14th December 2017, New Delhi, India. [Conference or Workshop Item]

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Abstract (in English)

When Blackpool Council decided to purchase Blackpool Tower and Winter Gardens at the height of the financial crisis in 2009, many people thought the move foolish. Not only were these huge entertainment complexes listed at Grade I and II, but both were in a poor state of repair. However, local communities had been outraged at their physical decline under private ownership and made it clear that the local authority needed to intervene before things went from bad to worse. The result was an innovative mix of partnership and direct control that has seen a consistent rise in the profit returned back to the maintenance of the buildings and an increased interest from major funders, thanks to the support and close involvement of the local community. Local government entrepreneurship isn’t a new thing, but cuts on UK public spending since 2009 (including serious cuts to the arts and heritage sectors) have forced a back to the future approach and one in which local communities provide a very real role in supporting both as shareholders in the process and its outcomes. In this presentation, Carl Carrington examines how local government can steer historic buildings into profitable operation in partnership with community groups. The session also looks at how this approach attracts further funding along the way to deliver a combination of innovative new use and the restoration and preservation of built heritage for future generations. The presentation will use Blackpool Winter Gardens as a case study where direct control by the Council has allowed a high level of public involvement in governance, public access and community activity alongside profitable business operation. It will outline the challenges in setting up the right stakeholder groups, business structures, and governance models. Relevant factors for success will be identified, particularly those transferable into other projects.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Authors:
AuthorsEmail
Carrington, CarlUNSPECIFIED
Languages: English
Keywords: sustainable; community; engagement; heritage; rehabilitation; decline; maintenance; Local government entrepreneurshi; United Kingdom; historic buildings; Blackpool Winter Gardens; governance model
Subjects: D.URBANISM > 02. Urban planning
E.CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION > 09. Social and economic aspects of conservation
G.DETERIORATION > 05. Prevention of deterioration
L.PRESENTATION AND TRANSMISSION OF HERITAGE > 04. Public awareness
National Committee: ICOMOS
ICOMOS Special Collection: Scientific Symposium (ICOMOS General Assemblies)
ICOMOS Special Collection Volume: 19th General Assembly, New Delhi, 2017
Depositing User: intern icomos
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2019 09:52
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2019 09:52
References: Winter Gardens Trust. (2013). Trustees Report For 2011/12: Unpublished Pg. 07

Winter Gardens Trust. (2014). Trustees Report For 2012/13: Unpublished Pg. 05

Winter Gardens Trust. (2015). Trustees Report For 2013/14: Unpublished Pg. 07

Winter Gardens Trust. (2016). Trustees Report For 2014/15: Unpublished Pg. 06

Winter Gardens Trust. (2017). Trustees Report For 2015/16: Unpublished Pg. 08
URI: http://openarchive.icomos.org/id/eprint/2043

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