The moral philosophy of nature: Spiritual Amazonian conceptualizations of the environment

Abad Espinoza, Luis Gregorio (2019) The moral philosophy of nature: Spiritual Amazonian conceptualizations of the environment. Open Journal of Humanities, 1 (1). pp. 149-190. ISSN 2612-6966 [Article]

[img]
Preview
PDF
The moral philosophy of nature Spiritual Amazonian conceptualizations of the environment.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (3MB) | Preview
Official URL: https://osf.io/68ynv/

Abstract (in English)

It is well known the harmful effects that savage capitalism has been causing to the environment since its introduction in a sphere in which a different logic and approach to nature are the essential conditions for the maintenance of the ecosystem and its complex relations between humans and non-human organisms. The amazon rainforest is a portion of the planet in which for thousands of years its human dwellers have been interacting with nature that it is understood beyond its physical condition. Thus, to what extent Amazonian’s approaches to nature could be considered as a moral philosophy through which the way of conceptualizing nature and its non-human denizens enhances the continuity of life and the intimate relations between entities? To answer this question, I will explore the cosmological system of the Shuar of the Ecuadorian Amazon with whom I lived for 5 months between July and November 2018, and thereby elucidate the spiritual relations that this society has with the metaphysical domain of nature.

Item Type: Article
Authors:
AuthorsEmail
Abad Espinoza, Luis Gregoriol.abadespinoza@campus.unimib.it
Languages: English
Keywords: Shuar; Ecuador; Amazonia; Human-Non-Human Relations; Nature-Culture Dichotomy; Cosmology; Waterfalls
Subjects: A. THEORETICAL AND GENERAL ASPECTS > 09. Philosophy of conservation
Q. LANDSCAPES > 08. Ethnographic Landscapes
H.HERITAGE TYPOLOGIES > 17. Intangible cultural heritage
Q. LANDSCAPES > 07. Indigenous/Traditional landscapes
J.HERITAGE ECONOMICS > 05. Heritage and sustainable development
N.ANTHROPOLOGY > 01. Generalities
N.ANTHROPOLOGY > 02. Ethnography
N.ANTHROPOLOGY > 03. Ethnology
N.ANTHROPOLOGY > 04. Other
O.INTANGIBLE HERITAGE > 02. Oral traditions and expressions (including language)
O.INTANGIBLE HERITAGE > 04. Social practices, rituals and festive events
O.INTANGIBLE HERITAGE > 06. Knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
P. GEOGRAPHIC AREAS > 01. Americas
Q. LANDSCAPES > 04. Sacred/Burial Landscapes
Volume: 1
Number: 1
ISSN: 2612-6966
Depositing User: Luis Gregorio Abad Espinoza
Date Deposited: 28 Feb 2020 15:04
Last Modified: 28 Feb 2020 15:04
References: Århem, K. 1990. “Ecosofía makuna.” In Correa, F. ed. La selva humanizada: ecología alternativa en el trópico húmedo colombiano. Bogotá:Instituto Colombiano de Antropología. 106-126.



Århem, K. 1996. “The Cosmic Food Web: Human-nature relatedness in the Northwest Amazon.” In Descola, P. and Gísli, P. eds. Nature and society: Anthropological perspectives. London/New York: Routledge. 185-204.



Arntzen, S. 1999. “Is Presocratic Philosophy of Nature a Source of Man-Nature Dualism?” In Boudouris, K. and Kalimtzis, K. eds. Philosophy and Ecology. Vol. II. Athens: Ionia Publications. 22-31.



Arntzen, S. 2003. Cultural Landscape and Approaches to Nature – Ecophilosophical Perspectives. Norway: Telemark University Collage.



Brown, M. 1986. Tsewa’s gift: magic and meaning in an Amazonian society. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.



Descola, P. 1992. “Societies of nature and the nature of society.” In Kuper, A. ed. Conceptualizing societies. London: Routledge. 107-126.



Descola, P. 1994. In the Society of Nature: A native ecology in Amazonia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.



Descola, P. 1996. “Constructing natures: Symbolic ecology and social practice.” In Descola, P. and Gísli, P. eds. Nature and society: Anthropological perspectives. London/New York: Routledge. 82-102.



Descola, P. 2005. “Ecology and Cosmological Analysis.” In Surrales, A. and Hierro, G.P. eds. The Land Within: Indigenous Territory and the Perception of Environment. Denmark: IWGIA. 22-35.



Gibson, J. 1979. The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.



Harner, M. 1968. “The Sound of Rushing Water.” Natural History 77/6: 28-33; 60-61.



Harner, M. 1972. The Jivaro, people of the sacred waterfalls. Garden City: Doubleday, Natural History Press.



Hugh-Jones, C. 1979. From the Milk River: Spatial and Temporal Processes in Northwest Amazonia. New York: Cambridge University Press.



Ingold, T. 1996. “The optimal forager and economic man.” In Descola, P. and Gísli, P. eds. Nature and society: Anthropological perspectives. London/New York: Routledge. 25-44.



Karsten, R. 2000 [1935]. La vida y la cultura de los Shuar. Quito: Abya-Yala.



Kohn, E. 2013. How Forests Think: Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human. Berkeley: University of California Press.



Lévi-Strauss, C. 1969 The Raw and the Cooked. New York: Harper & Row.



Manes, C. 1995. “Nature and Silence.” In Oehlschlager, M. ed. Postmodern Environmental Ethics. Albany: State University of New York Press.



Næss, A. 1989. Ecology, Community and Lifestyle. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press.



Næss, A. 1995a. “Ecosophy and Gestalt Ontology.” In Sessions, G. ed. Deep Ecology for the Twenty-First Century. Boston/London: Shambhala. 240-245.



Næss, A. 1995b. “The Third World, Wilderness, and Deep Ecology.” In Sessions, G. ed. Deep Ecology for the Twenty-First Century. Boston/London: Shambhala. 397-408.



Næss, A. 1995c. “Deep Ecology for the Twenty-Second Century.” In Sessions, G. ed. Deep Ecology for the Twenty-First Century. Boston/London: Shambhala. 463-468.



Pelizzaro, S. 1978. Nunkui. Sucua (Ecuador): Centro de documentación e investigación cultural shuar, Mundo shuar, Series F, Nº 8.



Plumwood, V. 2006. “The concept of a cultural landscape.” Ethics and the Environment 11/2: 115-150.



Rappaport, R. 1979. Ecology, Meaning and Religion. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books.



Rappaport, R. 2000 [1968]. Pig for the Ancestors: Ritual in the Ecology of a New Guinea People. Long Grove, Illinois: Waveland Press, Inc.



Reichel-Dolmatoff, G. 1971. Amazonian Cosmos: The Sexual and Religious Symbolism of the Tukano Indians. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.



Reichel-Dolmatoff, G. 1976. “Cosmology as ecological analysis: a view from the rain forest.” Man 2/3: 307-318.



Rosset, C. 1973. L’anti-nature: Eléments pour une Philosophie Tragique. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.



Spinoza, B. 1910. Ethics. London: J.M. Dent & Sons Ltd.



Stirling, M. 1938. Historical and ethnographical material on the Jivaro Indians. Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 117. Washington.



Taylor, A.-C. 2001. “Wives, Pets, and Affines: Marriage among the Jivaro.” In Rival, L. and Whitehead, N. eds. Beyond the Visible and the Material: The Amerindianization of Society in the Work of Peter Rivière. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 45-56.



Tilley, C. 1994. A Phenomenology of Landscape. Places, Paths and Monuments. Oxford: Berg Publishers.



Viveiros de Castro, E. 2011. “Zeno and the Art of Anthropology: Of Lies, Beliefs, Paradoxes, and Other Truths.” Common Knowledge 17/1:128-145.
URI: http://openarchive.icomos.org/id/eprint/2343

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Metadata

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics

© ICOMOS
http://www.international.icomos.org
openarchive(at)icomos.org